Tag snake antivenom
Toxicology-Library-Antidote-340-256

Black Snake Antivenom

Black Snake antivenom (equine IgG Fab) can be used to treat envenomation from the black snakes in Australia and Papua New Guinea, these include the mulga snake, Butler's mulga snake, Collett's snake, Papuan black snake, red-bellied black snake and the blue-bellied black snake
Toxicology-Library-Antidote-340-256

Death Adder Antivenom

Death Adder antivenom (equine IgG Fab) can be used to treat envenomation from the death adder in Australia and Papua New Guinea.
Toxicology-Library-Antidote-340-256

Brown Snake Antivenom

Brown Snake antivenom (equine IgG Fab) can be used to treat envenomation from the brown snakes in Australia, these include the eastern and western brown snake (gwardar), dugite and other Pseudonaja species
Toxicology-Library-Antidote-340-256

Tiger Snake Antivenom

Tiger Snake antivenom (equine IgG Fab) can be used to treat envenomation from the Tiger snakes in Australia, these include the Common and western Tiger snake, Stephen's banded snake, pale-headed snake, broad-headed snake, rough-scaled snake, copperhead snake and the small-eyed snake
Toxicology-Library-Antidote-340-256

Taipan Antivenom

Taipan antivenom (equine IgG Fab) can be used to treat envenomation from the Taipan snakes in Australia and Papua New Guinea, these include the Costal Taipan, Papuan Taipan and the small-scaled or fierce snake
Toxicology-Library-Antidote-340-256

Polyvalent Snake Antivenom

Polyvalent antivenom (equine IgG Fab) is used to treat snake envenomation from Australia and Papua New Guinea snakes. It contains the equivalent of an ampoule of Brown, Tiger, Black, Death and Taipan in 50ml.
CCC Critical Care compendium 340

Does Antivenom Work?

Antivenom is widely used for Australian envenoming syndromes. Antivenoms are generally perceived, by both clinicians and the general public, as highly effective treatments. However, there is little evidence to support this widely held view, in fact, the weight of evidence suggests that some antivenoms are ineffective in clinical practice.