Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 173

Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF, introducing the Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 173

Question 1

What arm do most people hold their babies?

Reveal the funtabulous answer

The Left

The phenomenon, which is called left-side bias or left-cradling bias, encourages the right side of the brain to process emotions and ability to monitor the baby. It occurs 70-85% of the time in humans.

However, humans are not unique other mammals do the same including feral horses, Pacific walrus, Siberian tundra reindeer, saiga antelope, muskox, eastern grey kangaroo and red kangaroo.


Question 2

If you were a psychiatrist what pathology might you find in 100 acre wood (Winnie the Pooh)?

Reveal the funtabulous answer

Shaken bear syndrome / OCD / ADHD

See the table below for a full list from these Canadian Authors and click on the reference for the full witty journal


Question 3

What are Mees lines?

Reveal the funtabulous answer

White lines of discolouration across the nails

Mees lines (aka Aldrich-Mees lines; Reynolds lines; leukonychia striata) are white lines of discoloration across the nails of the fingers and toes

First described by Dr RA Mees a Dutch physician in 1919 (although noted in previous years by Ernest Septimus Reynolds in 1901 and Aldrich in 1904).

Mees lines
Mees lines

They can appear after an episode of poisoning with arsenic, thallium or other heavy metals. They also occur in patient with renal failure and patients on chemotherapy


Question 4

What is phonism?

Reveal the funtabulous answer

No it’s not a prejudice against someones phone, it’s an auditory sensation produced by a stimulus of another sense e.g. taste, smell.


Question 5

Why did Dixon of Dock Green subject himself to bee-stings?

Reveal the funtabulous answer

As treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

The actor Warner, was getting elderly and looking increasingly implausible in uniform. He had increasing difficulty moving about, which was helped slightly by a treatment involving bee stings


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Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five

Dr Neil Long BMBS FACEM FRCEM FRCPC. Emergency Physician at Burnaby Hospital in Vancouver. Loves the misery of alpine climbing and working in austere environments. Supporter of FOAMed, toxicology, tropical medicine, sim and ultrasound

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