Category Toxinology
CCC Critical Care compendium 340

Does Antivenom Work?

Antivenom is widely used for Australian envenoming syndromes. Antivenoms are generally perceived, by both clinicians and the general public, as highly effective treatments. However, there is little evidence to support this widely held view, in fact, the weight of evidence suggests that some antivenoms are ineffective in clinical practice.
Toxicology-Library-Toxin-340

Blue Bottle Jellyfish

The bluebottle jellyfish is responsible for thousands of stings on Australian beaches each year. Clinical features include intense local pain and dermal erythema. Hot water immersion provides safe symptomatic relief. Unlike Physalia stings in other parts of the world, major systemic envenoming does not occur.
Toxicology-Library-Toxin-340

Box Jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri)

The box jellyfish is found in tropical Australian waters. Most stings are benign and respond to supportive measures. Severe envenoming has been associated with at least 67 deaths in Australia, the last 12 being children.
EBM Gone Wild mountain 340

Brown recluse bites

Last October, a report of death by loxoscelism was reported in Annals. It’s a sad story about a previously healthy 3 year old girl who was bitten by a witnessed brown recluse in Tennessee. She went to a rural ED,…

EBM Gone Wild sea 340

Stop peeing on it!

Many beach locations recommend the use of vinegar for jellyfish stings, and some go so far as to stock it at lifeguard(surf rescue) stations. But why did they decide to do that? Were there lots of studies performed?