Bubbles in the Wilderness

There have been many discussions and debates about the role of FOAM (free open-access meducation) in medical education, the pros, the cons and whether or not, it really is useful.

It may not be for everyone, yet for some individuals – especially those who are remote or isolated – FOAM has transformed how they learn, engage and enjoy medicine. A great example of this — one the RAGE team recommends you read — is Natasha Pirie-Burley’s account, Bubbles in the Wilderness: All about FOAM, published on the Adventure Medic blog.

In 2007 I struggled to find my passion or heroes within my workplace. I listened to closed minds and wondered why everyone was, “just getting through it”. It was un-inspiring and at times depressing. I resigned from my job in the UK and headed to the wilderness of America, New Zealand, Nepal, and Australia. I was searching for heroes and inspiration relevant to my life. Then last year, by chance, I found that Mawson’s bravery, Shackleton’s leadership, Dean Potter’s composure and the family Robinson’s ingenuity were right here at my fingertips and living in these medical pioneers of FOAM.

Natasha Pirie-Burley – Bubbles in the Wilderness: All about FOAM

Vive la FOAM!

Posted by Dr Chris Nickson

An oslerphile emergency physician and intensivist suffering from a bad case of knowledge dipsosis. Key areas of interest include: the ED-ICU interface, toxicology, simulation and the free open-access meducation (FOAM) revolution. @Twitter | + Chris Nickson | INTENSIVE| SMACC

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