André Strohl

André Strohl (1887 -1977)

André Strohl (1887 -1977) was a French physician and physicist.

Wide variety of interests and disciplines including neurology, radiology and physiology. Strohl published a number of books and papers relating to medical physics, electrophysiology, respiratory function and reflexes.

While an accomplished physician in his own right, Strohl is often remembered as the controversially omitted third author behind Guillain and Barré and the acute paralytic neuropathy known as Guillain – Barré syndrome described in 1916.


Biography

  • Born 20 March 1887 in Poitiers, France to parents from Alsace (an area previously governed by Germany and France alternatively during a series of wars)
  • 1913 – Bachelors degree in natural science, physical science and finally a medical degree, University of Paris
  • Served as a radiologist during World War I where he met Guillain and Barré
  • 1922-1925 Professor of Physiological Medicine in Algiers
  • 1926 – Professor of Physiological Medicine, University of Paris
  • 1957 – Retired
  • Died 10 March 1977

Medical Eponyms


Controversies

Despite being an original author on the seminal paper and contributing electrophysiological findings to demonstrate areflexia and altered nerve conduction, Strohl was omitted from further eponymous mentions of Guillain-Barré syndrome. No clear explanation of this omission has been identified, however a number of theories continue to circulate.

Possible explanations:

  1. Guillain and Barré published many articles throughout 1920 which did not include Strohl
  2. Strohl was a relatively newly graduated doctor at the time of the first publication, having only qualified 3 years before
  3. Strohl was not purely a neurologist by profession (including physiology and radiology), and it may have been felt that including his name reduced its standing amongst colleagues
  4. Strohl was the child of parents from Alsace

Major Publications


References


eponymictionary CTA

eponym

the person behind the name

Physician in training. German translator and lover of medical history.

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