Pick a body part. Pick a skin surface. Pick a block.

The Nerve Block App makes regional anaesthesia easier on the go.

With POCUS use now an integral part of Emergency Medicine training, many practitioners have developed a core skillset in performing ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks. Most of us will have started with the femoral nerve block and fascia iliaca compartment block, however these skills can be quickly translated to other regional blocks with appropriate education.

Emergency Physician Tom Fadial has created a free, shop floor accessible resource for determining the most appropriate block for individual anatomical sites.

Nerve Block: The user-friendly layout allows quick access on the shop floor

The user-friendly platform highlights the critical steps and equipment required for a variety of nerve blocks. It serves as a rapid reminder even for the more seasoned nerve-blockers on the go.

There are also quick references for local anaesthetic dosing and safety guidelines.

Nerve Block: Position, anatomical landmarks and technique are outlined for each block

The application teams up with Highland EM Ultrasound and POCUS Atlas to provide annotated image guides and basic videos, as well as links to more detailed educational resources for those wanting to learn these blocks for the first time.

Peripheral nerve blocks preclude the need for procedural sedation and provide adequate anaesthesia during painful procedures. This technique can be performed in the emergency department with the aid of ultrasound imaging to identify the target nerve

Bhoi et al, 2010

Best of all, it’s #FOAMed and FREE

Further reading

Ultrasound 700

ULTRASOUND LIBRARY

POCUS

MBBS (UWA) CCPU (RCE, Biliary, DVT, E-FAST, AAA) Emergency Medicine Advanced Trainee in Melbourne, Australia. Special interests in diagnostic and procedural ultrasound, medical education, and ECG interpretation. Editor-in-chief of the LITFL ECG Library. Twitter: @rob_buttner

MBChB, PGCert (Public Health), PGDip (Medical Ultrasound). UK Emergency Registrar gone walkabout in Melbourne, Australia. Interests include point-of-care ultrasound, critical care, #FOAMed and coffee. Twitter: @NishCherian

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