Tag Sir William Osler
Sir William Osler (1849- 1919) 340 2

Oslerus osleri

Sir William Osler was a man of not inconsiderable talent. A pathologist and clinician. A professor successively at McGill University, the University of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins University and Oxford University. Historian and bibliographer of medicine. A naturalist, microscopist, proponent of…

Aequanimitas osler 340

Becoming an Oslerphile

Learning about the life of Sir William Osler (1849-1919) is perhaps the ultimate lesson in how to live life and practice medicine. Yet, he doesn’t go to war, he doesn’t fight or kill anyone, he doesn’t change the Fates of…

Sir William Osler (1849- 1919) 340 2

Lessons from Osler 003

The art of observation is central to the art of medicine, and William Osler was its greatest teacher. Here are some more lessons from the master.
Sir William Osler (1849- 1919) 340 2

Lessons from Osler 002

William Osler teaches us that a sense of humor and fun helps doctors fight off stress, connect with others, and stops them from taking themselves too seriously.
Sir William Osler (1849- 1919) 340 2

Lessons from Osler 001

The Master Word for success in medicine, according to William Osler, is Work. But in the Generation Y era of lifestyle above all else, isn't work a dirty word?
Osler node 340

Osler node

Osler node: Painful, red, raised lesions usually found on the palms and soles. Caused by immune complex deposition and the resulting inflammatory response.
William-Osler-and-Egerton-Yorick-Davis-340 256

Penis captivus

What follows is the first report of penis captivus in the Philidelphia Medical News of December 13, 1884
William-Osler-and-Egerton-Yorick-Davis-340 256

Egerton Y. Davis

Egerton Yorick Davis was a frequent author of letters to medical societies, although only rarely would his penmanship be published. He was a retired US Army surgeon from Quebec who drowned in the Lachine Rapids in 1884 - his body was never recovered.
joseph bell sherlock holmes

Smith, Bell, and the Art of Observation

Sir Sydney Smith had humble beginnings in a village at the heart of the Otago gold fields, near the southern tip of New Zealand. After a stint in the New Zealand Army during the First World War and a colourful career as a medical investigator in colonial Egypt, he went on to hold the Chair of Forensic Medicine in Edinburgh.