Tag Abdominal Ecchymosis
eponymythology atraumatic abdominal ecchymosis 340

Atraumatic Abdominal Ecchymosis

Non-traumatic abdominal ecchymosis of the abdominal wall and flanks (Grey Turner, Cullen and Stabler); scrotum (Bryant) and upper thigh (Fox) as clues to potentially serious causes of abdominal pathology.
Cullen Sign 1918 Thomas Cullen 340

Cullen sign

Cullen sign: superficial bruising in the subcutaneous fat around the umbilicus. 1918 Thomas Cullen (1869-1953) ruptured ectopic pregnancy
Grey Turner sign 340

Grey Turner sign

Grey Turner sign refers to bruising of the flanks. Originally described 1919 (published 1920) by George Grey Turner (1877–1951) most commonly associated with acute pancreatitis
George Grey Turner (1877 – 1951) 1

George Grey Turner

George Grey Turner (1877–1951) English surgeon. Eponym: Grey Turner sign after description of flank ecchymosis in 1919 (published 1920)
eponym LITFL 340

John Henry Bryant

John Henry Bryant (1867–1906) English physician. Eponym: Blue Scrotum Sign of Bryant associated with ruptured abdominal aortic anurysm (1903)
Fox’s sign 340 2

Fox’s sign

Fox's sign: non-traumatic ecchymosis over the upper outer aspect of the thigh secondary to abdominal haemorrhage. First described by English surgeon John Adrian Fox in 1966
eponym LITFL 340

John A. Fox

John Adrian Fox English surgeon. Eponym: Fox's sign (1966) non-traumatic ecchymosis upper outer thigh with abdominal haemorrhage
Francis (Frank) Edward Stabler (1902 – 1967) 1

Francis Edward Stabler

Francis (Frank) Edward Stabler (1902 – 1967) English surgeon, obstetrician and gynaecologist. Eponym: Stabler Sign - atraumatic abdominal wall ecchymosis